BASS BARN banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,967 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Almost 100% of the fishing regulation coming down the pipe focuses on how to restrict fishing activity. Shorter seasons, closed areas, limited access, complete closures, smaller creel limits, etc. are what we see. Wouldn't it be interesting if some of the money and effort the government expends could be put into increasing the amount of fish in the ocean!

Our oceans are an amazing soup of marine organisms waiting to find a home. The shifting sands of our ocean floor serve as poor substrate for marine growth. Beach replenishment projects, bottom trawling, ocean silting, natural storms, etc all have reduced the amount of hard structure needed to establish marine communities.

Any substantial hard object dropped to the ocean floor very quickly establishes a whole marine community. Every wreck out there whether intentional sunk, lost to fishing activity related mishaps, or sunken during wartime activity, quickly establishes a whole ecosystem of its own.

New Jersey is lucky to have one of the finest artificial reef systems on the east coast under the previous leadership of Bill Figley and now Hugh Carberry. Environmentalists like to argue (wrongly) that the reefs just congregate fish and not increase their numbers. Science has clearly shown that artficial reef materials increase the numbers of species that use them for foraging and habitat. Studies show the hundreds of thousands of marine creatures that establish themselves on every single yard of material so deployed.

It always goes through my mind what our fishing would be like if we had strips of reefs encompassing the whole coast of New Jersey. There is little doubt that the more reef material we have, the more fish we would have. The more yards of reef material we have, the more food resources we create for the fish. The more food, the more fish will flourish and grow. For east west migrating fish like fluke, sea bass, and tog, we would need to provide for deep water reef structures too to aid their feeding during the winter months (although feeding activity is less in colder waters).

There was a time when white marlin, tuna, fluke, cod, etc were caught alot closer to shore. Some blame this on overfishing and perhaps global warming. I have always believed that loss of inshore structure and the inadequacy of shelf water structure. is one reason we have to travel so far.
Much is written about the poor infrastructure of our land based activities such as roads, bridges, electrical transmission lines, etc. I think we need to build more marine infrastructure as well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,027 Posts
It always goes through my mind what our fishing would be like if we had strips of reefs encompassing the whole coast of New Jersey... ...I think we need to build more marine infrastructure as well!
I would love to see all of that NY harbor bedrock spread out 1 or 2 ft thick all over. Could you imagine the oldgrounds covering 200 sq miles?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,884 Posts
This is a subject Ive been talking about to my neighbor here in Florida. He is a marine biologist here in Florida at Harbour Branch one of the worlds premier marine research facilities. Recent research on red snapper has proven your point that all the oil and gas wells in the gulf have increased the population not concentrated it for easy killing.
The future he tells me however is where all the money is going and thats aquaculture. Growing fish from eggs is about to dramatical change both recreational and comercial fishing. Some species like Cobia, Pompano, shrimp, and catfish are very succesfull. There may be a point where some species will no longer be taken commercialy because of the success of the farming.
They have learned that they can grow pompano in almost fresh water. There may be time soon where a restaraunt in Chicago will order their pompano from a indoor grow facility in Chicago using great lakes water.
Recreational fishing will also be affected by aquaculture. In Florida thaty are working on raisng million of fish to fingerling size to be released back into the enviroment. Probably less then 1% of the 30 million eggs a cow strper lays ever make it to 3 or 4 inches where they have better chance of survivng.
The Snook down here were killed bad by the recent cold. It will take 5 years for the population to return to normal naturaly. It may be a much quiker recovery because there is talk the state will start raising millions of baby snook this summer for release.
Even a healthy population like fluke could be increased by aquaculture resulting in longer seasons and smaller size limits for the recreational fishermen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,281 Posts
Even if they don't do a stocking program, moving to aquaculture for commercial use would take such a tremendous strain off of the resource, it would be almost self correcting. I think KSONG was saying this is pretty much what happened in Korea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,967 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good post captain .Now how do we get Trenton & Washington listen

Skip...........It would have been great if we could have gotten reef enhancement financed under the Obama stimulus plan. Certainly this money spent would have better spent then some of the plans. It is tough in this economic environment to get funds for anything. I know the NJ Fish and Game folks are operating on a tight budget. We all can continue to send donations to the artificial reef fund and do our part anyway. I know Highwire is very familiar with the Artificial Reef Program and may have some suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,994 Posts
Barrell,
your reply is a completely differnent subject matter it is a very interesting subject, however what is the point that on a thread like this?
Capt ( Dr.) Harv, is one of our most respected intellectual poster of scientific subject matter. His post has nothing to do with your reply.

Start a fresh post please, to discuss aquaculture.
Captn Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,884 Posts
Barrell,
your reply is a completely differnent subject matter it is a very interesting subject, however what is the point that on a thread like this?
Capt ( Dr.) Harv, is one of our most respected intellectual poster of scientific subject matter. His post has nothing to do with your reply.

Start a fresh post please, to discuss aquaculture.
Captn Joe
The title of the captains post is "the supply side of fish management" I brought up the latest research in the Gulph that shows the oil and gas rigs are actualy increasing fish populations not concentrating them. That point mimicks what the captain was saying about reefs. I added what I have been hearing about the future of aquaculture. Which I thought was relevent to the original discusion. If Capt Harv feels like I hijacked his thread? I apologize and will not respond again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,994 Posts
Barrell,
no, I was more focused in what he wrote about as opposed to the title, he is talking fish here on the bottom.

I just thought your subject warrants a good conversation, The United Sates is light years behind the world in Aqua culture. Did you see Kil Song's Post about his trip home to Korea?? Mostly everything in the market was farmed, ( fish, shellfish, etc>>>) and it all looked good!

I know there is alot of concern over raising fish, but there are plenty of things that can be done - done right, without too much concern.

I do know one thing, who ever wrote twenty years ago about the supply side of Auquaculture, they were correct in their guess to how it has grown , supplying a bigger portion of what is offered for sale here in the US.
Captn Joe

Captn Joe
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top