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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Plan on trying the tog thing on some jetties pretty soon, and I want to pick the brains of some tog sharpies here on the Barn.I've caught a few while fishing for sea bass,but now I'm going to try and target them on purpose.Any help on line size,different sizes of lead to bring,favorite rigs,and about how many crabs 1 person will need for a 4-6 hour trip will really help me out.Thanks in advance for any feedback.
 

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Green Crab / Clam ok

Virginia Hook #2

Small leader 4 inches

Bring a lot of rigs

Stiff Rod, Heavy line

1-2 set the hook, reel fast

I go through about 1 dozen myself in 3-4 hours

Good luck
 

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With regards to green crabs, when you are left with just white inside, you should change your bait. If not picked at by small fish, it will wash out before long. I'm not afraid to change baits every couple minutes. If you can get bites on half crabs and they are mostly small fish, then start fishing whole crabs, cracking the back shell. Whole crabs should use a 2 hook rig. (Snell one hook to either end of an 18" piece of leader, then put a dropper loop in the middle. Attach this rig to your mainline via a loop-to-loop connection about 6" above your weight.) One hook in a leg socket on either side of the crab.

You can also try catching your own bait. Invest in one of the ring type crab traps and a few bunker. Put it out off the end of the rock pile in 8' - 10' of water, and let it soak for 10 - 15 minutes. In a couple of pulls, you'll probably have all the crabs you need. (They won't be greenies, but don't be afraid to try what you catch. :cool: )
 

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i would use 60 lb leader--gamagatsu octopus 4/0 hook--50lb power pro--an easy rig is single dropper loop--weight on loop--if you need a diagram contact me I will fax you one-If you can catch calico crabs they are great from the beach--NG
 

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heavy set up - heavy line to help with 1)wear on the rocks and 2) no time to play with drag - all they want to do is dive back down and hide in the rocks - so fish heavy and "pluck" them out of the water, don't reel and play with them .
Dr.Bass got it right about setting the hook 1-2 let them hit, crack the bait, taste it - then SET IT. You must exercise patients - they don't attack bait like blues or bass.
Also, they are strictly a day light feeder - don't bother without sunlight
 

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[Also, they are strictly a day light feeder - don't bother without sunlight [/QB][/QUOTE]

So true, and I know the hard way. It is amazing, no sunlight and off
 

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These guys got it right, all of what they say is good.

About the sunlight, as I understand it, tog seem to be a sight feeder. They require daylight, but it can be a cloudy day and overcast as well as a bright one. Usually the brighter, the better the bite, although last Friday I had 7 keepers, 2-1/2 to 8 pounds, fishing 2-4 miles out off Wildwood. The weather was anywehere form freary to sunlight.

I have had days where every cast was a hit, and then, all of a sudden, the sun went down and the bite totally disappeared.

The secret to getting tog in, especially when wreck fishing, (and on a jetty and rocks too), is the first 5 feet. You cannot let them take you back into the hole. Lift that rod to 12 o'clock and keep it there, cranking as you lift it. You need to have them clear of their "home. You need a sturdy stick, not a graphite one. The quick pull required to set and lift a decent tog will snap the graphite rod. I know, I've snapped several. A good fiberglass stick works well.

You also need to check your line or leader everytime you pull in. Some guys tie a 10-12 ft piece of 60-80# leader on and just tie rigs on as they cut the frayed leader off. The one/two hit, for what it's worth, is quick. It is a bam-bam, thank you ma'am!

If you pull after the second hit, likely your hook is clean.

It's been said, that if fish were a football team, the tog would be the fullbacks becasue of their short powere bursts. I agree with that.

Lord, I love toggin'!!!
 

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a nice tog stick is the st croix catfish rods--they are fiberglass and we use the 7'6" 16oz--it is a great rod--has a great bend that fights the fish and ir real sturdy--it picks the weight off the bottom real nice--check one out-NG
 

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Your talking about fishing a land based jetty, which is really a whole nother world from tog fishing wrecks and rockpiles from a boat...

For this kind of fishing you need serious gorilla tackle to be successful..they're really is not fight involved, your just hooking them and getting them to the top as quickly as possible.

What you need is a seriously heavy rod...something with a fairly stout tip...graphite is okay, composite is good...if your going with fiberglass you want something that is very heavy that will only bend at the tip...given the nature of fiberglass blanks most are slow action bending throughout the length of the blank(great for wreck fishing, not good for jetty fishing)...if you go fiberglass you need to think telephone pole.

For jetty fishing I would go mono to be honest, 80lb...to do that, fill the reel with a lighter mono and topshot the reel with 50-75yrds of the heavy mono...while braid is super sensitive with no stretch...80lb mono will hold up better to the type of abraision your going to get pulling the fish back into the nasty stuff(thats the reason for the seriously heavy tackle and getting them up as quick as possible...as your bringing the fish in your pulling it into serious structure)

For rigs, you can go with a simple one hook rig...Mustad Virginia 4011E hooks size 4 or 3, or Gami octopus hooks 3/0, or Owner SSW hooks size 5/0 snelled on 60lb leader..one side snelled to hook the other tied in a loop using a double surgeons loop....leader inches 6-10 inches. Then tie up a bunch of small loops in 20-25lb test using a double surgeons....Basically you make a loop in the 80lb leader using a double surgeons, do a loop to loop connection on your lighter line loop(for your sinker) and up a couple inches attach your snelled hook(basically pinch the leader to form a loop, loop from snelled hook goes over that...hook drawn thu loop and then lock it with an overhand knot...

Sinker anywhere from 6-10oz depending on current, heavier better...

Bites range from day to day, fish to fish...some will pull the rod out of your hands, some will give you a distinct tug...but more often than not, all you get are stratchy hits...feel like your sinker is moving...soon as you feel that, just lift the rod...if you hook up get the fish up quickly....all you need to do is lift the rod..no need to tear your underware trying to set the hook....thats where alot of broken rods come in, graphite/composite/fiberglass alike...what generally happens is you miss the hit taking a wild swing and hook the wreck/rockpile and put way too much pressure on the blank...

That will get you started...could write a bunch more but fingers hurt...lol

Have fun..

Phil L
 

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Phil, you are absolutely correct in that jetty fishing for tog is a whole different world. Jetty fishing is my favorite.

Fishing for tog off of bulkheads such as the one at North Wildwood is another world from Jetties. At jetties and rocks you are not casting out for, if any. You are dropping in close to the rocks.

At North wildwood, you sometimes need to cast out pretty far, 30 to say 100 feet. When you hook up there you have to be able to reel in high and quick!

What I do there is to use maybe a size 19 rubber band that I slip through the dropper loop and tie my sinker on with. I use a reel spooled with a topshot of 60 # mono.

I also use spark plugs for sinkers at N Wildwood and off the jetties. (Go to any garage and ask if you can put a 3 pound coffee can there and pick it up every few weeks. They normally are great guys.)

I found that if you get one of those large paper clips, the kind that can hold a 1/4 inch or more of paper, you can put a sprkplug on each leg. Thus you get 2-43 oz of weight. I even tie the clip on to the dropper loop with a rubber band.

One of the things the double spark plugs on the paper clip does is to give you a small edge on the rocks. It will not drop into small holes readily. I have fished the entire day without losing a spark plug that way, but I have also gone through several V-8's worth of spark plugs on other days.

You never know. You always need to have a good supply of hooks and weights with you when you go for tog.

[ 12-02-2004, 11:00 AM: Message edited by: DopicDick ]
 

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Don't forget the Korkers!
Lots of good advice from Phil and Dopic.
When toggin' from the rocks I also like to use a longer rod. I have an old 8' St.Croix stiff fiberglass conventional rod with metal guides that I bought when Jack Blades went out of business a few years ago mated to an old Penn Long Beach reel that has plenty of salt corrosion but still works smooth enough. Strictly a jetty tog rig. The point here is that your equipment will take a lot of abuse from the rocks with the inevitably constant dropping on the rocks to change rigs, re-bait, re-rig and lets not forget to (hopefully)unhook the fish. With this rig I don't have to worry about the rock rash and am able to concentrate on the fishing. There are no ceramic guides to pop out, graphite to scratch etc. I don't ever have to risk slipping to save my reel from falling and getting scratced. Which brings me back to Korkers as required equipment. Those rocks are HARD and POINTY and SLIPPERY. If you have a short boat rod you will be tempted to reach out too far, possibly be off balance when a fish hits. The long rod allows you to let out just enough line to drop the bait in front of some rocks and rest it on some ledge or in some hole. Then, when the fish hits, you can just swing it up and out onto the rocks without reeling, or you can lift it up far enough so that your hook is in sight to check the bait or reposition it without the constant reeling. Low tech fishing so an expensive reel isn't required in my humble opinion.
As far as rigs, I also keep it simple and cheap.
I suggest two packages of snelled size 4 Virginia style or Blackfish hooks and about a dozen 2 & 3 oz bank style sinkers. I run the loop of the leader through the eye of the sinker and then the hook through the loop of the leader so that the sinker is at one end of the leader and the hook is at the other. I then fold the leader in half and tie an overhand loop in the middle of the leader. I attach my running line to the middle loop so I have the sinker about 4" from the middle loop and the hook stands out to the side about 4" above the sinker. Having the hook on a short leader above the sinker makes me believe that I can feel any tugs better. I like to tie up a bunch of these rigs, sinker and all in advance and carry them in a zip-lock bag with an extra package of hooks and extra sinkers. The tackle box can stay in the truck. A five gallon bucket, knife, pliers, rag, my bag of hooks and sinkers, a smaller bucket inside with the crabs, and I can safely walk on the jetty with the bucket in one hand and the rod in the other. With toggin' I try to keep it Simple and Safe.
You've heard of Striper fever.
I think you can see from the length of the posts that once bitten with the Tog bug, you can become just as passionate. And every togger is just as passionate about his or her favorite rig.
Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for sharing the info guys!!!Can't wait till the weekend to try it out,I'll post my results.
 

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Originally posted by BIGGESTJACK:
which bottom feeders will bite after dark??
I've caught my biggest flounder at night. Also all the junk fish will feed at night.
 

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I have fished off the North Wildwood rocks for years. Fished the bridge pilings for tog with my father back into the 50's. He let me get real frustrated before he let me in on a few tips. Said I listened better when I was pi--ed.

After watching tog in our aquarium for years I can see why they can be frustrating. I can't tell you how many people came into our store, looked at the aquarium and said. You have a dead fish in there. Without looking I would say. It's not dead, it's just a tog.

They lay on their side flat on the bottom. They do headstands on top of rocks. They dig holes and lay inside them. They swim backwards. They eyeball a piece of food longer than any other fish I have ever seen. They love clam, shrimp and crabs.

After many trips with my father where he caught many and I didn't he gave me his best tip. Tog are famous for giving you little taps where a hook set is nothing more than a swing and a miss. They can suck the meat out of a crab bait without ever touching the hook. His method was simple and it worked. Feel the first tap and slowly lift your rod. The tog has had a taste and is more than willing to pick at the bait until it is cleaned out. By slowly lifting the tog sees an easy meal getting away. They will usually strike hard in response to it's meal escaping. Sometimes it's tap tap lift then resistance. Set the hook.

Sometimes tog can be real picky and drive you nuts with lots of hits but few hookups. I have seen this happen many times. Tog moves in for a crab. Tog darts in and with a snap of it's jaw a crab leg is missing. This will happen time after time until the legs are gone. Then the tog gets serious and starts to eat. Sometimes they just don't want the legs. I take scissors and cut the legs off just short of the body. Then pass the hook through the joint for a good bait hook up. Don't try pulling the legs off because you will pull meat out of the shell. Other times it doesn't matter and legs and all will be gulped down. Keep this leg cutting idea for when the bite is frustrating.

When fishing the rocks my best catches came from casting way out. Then slowly bring it back in. Just short of the rocks you will find their zone where they look for targets heading for the protection of the rocks. Caught many large tog at the outer boundries of the rock piles.

Like many here have said. Good stout tackle is a must. Strong line and stiff rods will pull them out of the rocks. Another good idea is a very fast retrieve reel. The faster you can reel them in the less chance they have of digging in.

Don't forget clam. May loose more baits but sometimes tog will go for a soft meal faster than one with a shell.

Good luck.
 

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This has been an excellent thread!!!

It is reminiscent of some of the lengthy informative threads that we had on The Barn say 2-3 years ago, when everyone was new and questions abounded.

I read the Barn forums for a half year when I first joined, and was in awe at all of the information and skills presented. I felt that I could contribute nothing. :confused: And then tog time came and people asked for help on catching tog, catching fidler crabs, various baits for tog, etc, and I finally felt I could contribute something. This is a great thread. Thanks, guys. :D

Originally posted by crabfeedr
I think you can see from the length of the posts that once bitten with the Tog bug, you can become just as passionate. And every togger is just as passionate about his or her favorite rig.
crabfeedr, You are so correct. And you know, there are so many ways that work well. If anyone fishes the rocks at North wildwood at the Anglesea parking lot, I am sure they are familiar with the lady who fishes near the bulkhead point with a hand line that she throws out. She puts most of us guys to shame and our stout, expensive tackle is no match for her hand line and skill.

Speaking of handlines, what precious and great memories from childhood that brings back.


Fred, very interesting information from the aquarium. I guess I need to break down and buy a set of stainless scissors to cut the crab legs. I am one that removes the large front claws by ripping them off, but leaves the rest of the legs on. You are right, you lose some meat, sometimes a lot.
 

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I'm headed out on a headboat for a 12hr tog trip tomorrow. I can't wait. This thread has been extremley informative. Thanks.
 

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As to crab baits, really depends on the day...blackfish are definetly goofy and some days have preferences for certain baits over others...I've seen it go from one thing to another over the course of a day...moral of the story...dont get comfortable fishing one type of bait...experiment until you find exactly what the fish want..

What I mean by that using green crab as an example...is there are times that fish will hit a half with legs over everything else, or a half without legs, or a whole small crab with cracked shell, or whole small crab without shell...you even see preferences in crab color...some days the little green bellies or larger green belly halfs, some yellow halfs, and some little whole orange belly or big half orange bunny halves...

The point keep playing with different things til you get the bite, then stick with it and if it slows start playing again with baits until you get it back....I've had it go to a growling bite with small whole grennies to a better bite on halves with legs with the wholes not getting a touch and then back again.

Then you throw in whiteleggers and have seen the bit go from whiteleggers without a sniff on grennies to growling on greenies and nothing on the leggers to back on the leggers...

And what chunking said is gospel...some of the best fishing and biggest fish hang on the edge of the structure not in the thick of it....same goes for wreck fishing...some of the absolute best fishing I've ever had was on the up current edge of a wreck...where you could walk the sinker off the edge of the wreck to its base...there are slight variations however and you do find good fishing on some pieces in the thick of it and on different days they might be on the downcurrent side or thick in one particular location....

Also if you get a nice fish out of a particular spot...throw right back to it..cant tell you how many times I've taken multiple big fish or really had a mad dog bite on a really small area, when other sections of the boat are alot slower(even seen that on my boat and I only have a 20 Grady overnighter)..

I guess the moral to my post is be adaptive, dont get in a rut of using a bait cut one way, get in the zone(toggin is all about being in the zone concentratin...generally togin first then socializin), and when you put a pattern together put it away in the mental file for future trips...

That it for now...I cant feel my fingers....

Phil L
 

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One more little tidbit, on bites....from speaking to alot of guys about toggin, there is generally a misnomer that you should wait until you feel two good bites before setting up on the fish...the whole bam, bam..set on the second bam..

Be careful about getting into the habit of doing that...I've found it to be very commonplace on the south jersey wrecks that you get alot of very scratchy hits and alot of times these hits are from real quality fish...sometime all the hit your going to get is the feeling that your sinker might be moving or the very slightest of nudges that even with powerpro feel almost non existant...I've also seen that some of the best fish I've taken down there, you had to set up when you felt the fish take the crab, before you felt any bump....very hard to describe but a second or two before you get any discernable hit, you get the feeling of something different than your sinker just sitting...I couldnt even explain it...its just that second or two of scratchyness for lack of a better word...I actually think its when the blackfish is mouthing the bait before it picks it up....

Moral of that story...if you feel anything out of the ordinary prior to getting a hit...lift the rod and be ready to put the boots to the fish...if nothing there...drop it right back down...more times than not a fish was mouthing the bait and if you drop it right back down, he'll come right back to it...

Okay..now I am done for a bit..

Phil L
 
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