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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen,
I have yet to post on this site because usually I can find the answer to my questions thru the search feature and I am a bit of a novice so I have limited thoughts to offer.
I would like your opinions as to the steering control of a trolling motor. I recently purchased a 17’ center console that I plan to install a trolling motor on. The boat has a nice platform in the front and I plan to do a bit of fly casting from there. I have researched the 2 major brands thru the net and it appears the “toughest” models from either company are hand control only. I have no problem with that, I prefer low tech but am afraid the hand control would be a bother with the fly line. I see the options available on some of the other models – co-pilot, I-pilot and wired/wireless. I think I would be more comfortable with a foot control with a cable than a wireless model but my first choice would be the “toughest” model available. So, do any of you guys use a hand control trolling motor while fly-fishing and is it a great hindrance?
Thank You
Gee
 

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Gentlemen,
I have yet to post on this site because usually I can find the answer to my questions thru the search feature and I am a bit of a novice so I have limited thoughts to offer.
I would like your opinions as to the steering control of a trolling motor. I recently purchased a 17’ center console that I plan to install a trolling motor on. The boat has a nice platform in the front and I plan to do a bit of fly casting from there. I have researched the 2 major brands thru the net and it appears the “toughest” models from either company are hand control only. I have no problem with that, I prefer low tech but am afraid the hand control would be a bother with the fly line. I see the options available on some of the other models – co-pilot, I-pilot and wired/wireless. I think I would be more comfortable with a foot control with a cable than a wireless model but my first choice would be the “toughest” model available. So, do any of you guys use a hand control trolling motor while fly-fishing and is it a great hindrance?
Thank You
Gee
Minnkota makes the best and IMO the hand control is the best when fly fishing. Foot pedals really grab line, can throw off your balance which trying to use them and either way you still have the head unit vertical. The powerdrive mounts are no good because they take two hands to drop or retrieve the trolling motor. I prefer a sciccor mount because everything can be done with one hand.

The Minn Kota Riptide Pro 80 was the Best TM I have ever owned.
 

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Bow Mounted Wrist Controlled

I love the Minnkota Rip Tide bowmounted motor. I don't mind using two hands to put the motor up or down. The wrist control works great as you can control the boat from anywhere. It is especially good when I have a charter fishing on the bow or when fishing by myself. If a fish runs to the back of the boat I can quickly control the boat even if I move to the back of the boat to fight it.

Foot controls catch your fly line all the time. The auto pilot is great for fishing into a current. Set your speed to that of the current or a little faster and it is almost like being anchored and great for working sod banks or rock jetties.

Hand controled ones are a pain to always keep adjusting. I am so use to using the wrist control while fly fishing that I wouldn't want to do it any other way. The only time it is difficult is when fishing in heavy waves or winds as the auto pilot is sensitive to too much bouncing and on manually you have to constantly keep adjusting whether using a foot or wrist controller. No way of getting around it other than having some one else control the boat while you fish.
 

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I tend to agree with Capt Ray on this one. I've used hand, foot and remote controll units. Once you get used to the wrist control, it's golden. Does take getting used to it though.
The only thing I'd add to the discussion is, if I were doing it all over again, I'd mount my TM on a quick release type base. Ray works a particular niche. If you're going to be changing from the back bay, jetties etc. to offshore, rips and covering long distances in 2-3 footers the ability to leave the motor, home or in the truck is nice. They can take a beating up there on the nose in heavy seas.
I have a 17 center Triumph. Make sure your mounting is very sound, backing plates etc.
 

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Gee Glad you finally came aboard & we look forward to hearing more from you. I trust the info will help you. Good luck & hope to see some reports.
 

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I agree on the good mounting. I use the plate where the motor slides on. You turn in a screw and then put a pad lock on. Takes about 1 minute to remove. Puck type mount is faster to remove. It works but I think the the plate type is stronger.

Only problem with electric motors on the bow is that sooner or later you take green water over the bow. They are pretty water proof but drenching them under water is not good. The lower the bow of the boat the more chance of it happening, especially if you are going out in inlets and the ocean.

Also I like the 24 volt motors. They have more thrust and seem to last longer on a charge, but I am pushing a 22 foot 8 ft wide boat. In a smaller boat you may not have the room for the extra battery. Motor should have its own battery or batteries. Don't try running it off your starting battery. You could drain it down and then not be able to start your main engine.

On my boat I have two deep cells for electric and a starting battery. Also have it set up that I can hit a switch if I need to use one to boost starting battery or to start engine.

Leaving my boat at the marina I have a charger that automatically charges and monitors all three batteries indepentently.

If you trailer you can save money and do re-charging manually.
 

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I had an 18' Lund Alaskan (aluminum) with a Minn Kota 55lb Rip Tide.
Mine was hand controlled. Because the bow was 3 ' higher than where I was standing the hand control wasn't bad. I put an extension handle on it.
Mine mounted over a plate that had a large U bracket that held it on and was lockable.

My point, 55lb is not enough in saltwater with tides and wind. It would barely make headway in a strong tide.
Capt Ray is right 24V 80 lbs minimum.
 

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I have a sw bow mount with foot control. It was used so I didnt really have an option on controls. It does however have an option to install a remote which I havnt done.

I know Ray and others have mastered the hand control and I cant comment on this since I never ran them but I really like the foot control. Like John said tt is a line grabber but I use a stripping basket, not because of this just because I like the basket but it solves this issue.

I agree with John too you could easily loose your balance in rough seas by my whaler has a grab bar I added padding too that I lean against and it allowd full stability even in rough conditions. What I like is I never have to take my hands off the line while dealing with strong currents, bridges, rocks, fighting fish etc..

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the input to this question. I am sold on the 24V and have ruled out the foot control. Still undecided on the wireless feature or hand control. I plan on checking out these different models at the AC boat show. Actually putting my hands on the pieces will help. Hopefully you guys will see me in the back bays come spring time. I'll be in a 17' McKee CC if you care to say hello.
Thanks Again!
 

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ALso Minn Kota offers the GPS controlled unit. Sounds very cool..

I have two remotes for my MK 24V bow mount SW motor..

I give one to my fishing partner and we both control the boat. If one guy hooks up the other guy can assume control. It works well because he has the same setup. Very helpful around bridge pilings and strong current.
 

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ALso Minn Kota offers the GPS controlled unit. Sounds very cool..

I have two remotes for my MK 24V bow mount SW motor..

I give one to my fishing partner and we both control the boat. If one guy hooks up the other guy can assume control. It works well because he has the same setup. Very helpful around bridge pilings and strong current.

". If one guy hooks up the other guy can assume control."

That sounds good but I think Fred would get tired of always controlling the boat. :D
 

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FLYGUY784,
I have a related question where hopefully you can help. I have a 17 center Logic, which is a prehistoric Triumph similar to yours. I'm buying a Riptide RT, 80lb thrust with i-pilot. My question is which length did you get, 54" or 60"? I fish back bays Cape May/N. Wildwood and just outside Cape May canal. My current thoughts are to go with the 60. I've installed the 24V wiring and batteries and will be buying the TM soon.

Thanks!
Rick
 

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I have the longer shaft unit. Being longer will allow the power head to remain under water as the bow rides up and down in the waves, depending on wave height. I'd rather have the extra length there should I need it. :thumbsup:
 

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I have the longer shaft unit. Being longer will allow the power head to remain under water as the bow rides up and down in the waves, depending on wave height. I'd rather have the extra length there should I need it. :thumbsup:

There is John, bragging about his shaft length again :eek: :D

I have to agree with him though, my prop will pop out of the water when its choppy because of the shorter length.
 
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