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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a 1988 Evinrude 140 with VRO. The guy I bought it from said that it worked fine. I've never delt with vro before so I'm not sure about how it works. I got it all hooked up and started but Im not sure if the vro is working. How can I tell? Does the alarm go off if it's not pumping oil or if the oil level is low? How hard is it to disconnect it all together?
 

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easy to disconnect, plug the oil line near the pump. unplug the sender (near the pump) make sure the temp is still hooked up to the head. mix the tank 50:1 and prime the line to the pump. start and enjoy knowing if the motor is running, the motor is oiling!!! ran two john 200's 200+hours that way, no probs. run de-carb regularly and new plugs. will smoke a tiny bit more at no wake speeds.
 

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I agree with Wilson If the VRO fails you won't know and their goes your motor real easy to disconnect, play it safe
 

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My low oil alarm decided to start working after I melted 2 pistons,my fault for not checking the oil level,got used to depending on the BEEP at a 1\4 tank.Paid out the arse.I now mix and worry about finding fish.
 

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You may think you are doing right by disconnecting your VRO pump but you may want to think twice. VRO stood for variable ratio oiling, which stroked the pump differently according to crankcase pulses. Meaning the engine would be leaner on oil at idle and richer at higher rpms. When you disconnect the pump you are mixing at a constant 50 to 1 ratio which the engine does not need at lower rpms and causes carbon build up in the engine, which in turn causes piston rings to stick in ring glands and allows combusted gases to enter the crankcase and over heats pistons causing failures. A vast majority of VRO/OMS failures are do to Bad fuel, high vaccum from fuel restrictions in the fuel system and engine backfires or lean sneeze conditions from carb issues, or improper sync and link adjustments. OMC and BRP built this system for over 20 years if it were that bad I would think they would have changed to another system.

One last note, I have customers and dealers bring me powerheads all the time saying that the oil pump failed and caused one cylinder to go bad. A majority of the time if an oil pump fails it going to take out a lot more then one cylinder . You will usually see scuffing problems on all cylinders along with bluing of the wrist pin bearings and wrist pins and often into the rod bearings and crank bearings. Individual cylinder failures are often due to detonation, preignition, lean fuel conditions or a part failure due to heat, fatigue, or excessive carbon build up.
 

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my hpdi's go to something like 400:1 at idle, sounds very lean. but true a motor running slow doesn't need that much oil. i have 1/4 mile of no wake than 60 miles at power. those johnny's where so thirsty i didn't have alot fuel to troll around, she was on the chunk or on the bunks!! that's why i went off the pump. if i was putting around the bay, i would be able to montor the oil consumption. i did however started using synthetic oil. and i think that helped some with the smoke. it's a 50/50 issue, i heard both sides say do and don't do it. i did and didn't have any problems. i just stayed on top of the carbon. i don't miss the fuel they used but nothing sounds better than those old carb motors on the power!!! absolute roar!!!:D
 

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wilson said:
.....my hpdi's go to something like 400:1 at idle...
That 400:1 is not what the motor receives, that is the amount of oil that is mixed with the fuel inside the vapor separator tank to lubricate and clean the injectors.

The motor gets its internal oiling from the pump on the side of the engine and that is close to 100:1 at idle and quickly jumps to 40:1 to 50:1 depending on the model as the rpms increase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the feed back. I still would like to know if there is a way that I can tell if it is pumping or not. I just bought it and I don't want to mess it up.
 

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You can also put a mark on the oil tank. You can add a quart of oil into your gas to 24 gallons of gas while your making sure the pump is working. How many wires are comming out of the wire harness on the pump?
 

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barnaclebillsmarine said:
You can also put a mark on the oil tank. You can add a quart of oil into your gas to 24 gallons of gas while your making sure the pump is working. How many wires are coming out of the wire harness on the pump?
BB, needs this info to tell if it's a VRO II....

I've probably run 20 outboards to death on the VRO's and 20 by disconnecting it, but what I never liked was the fact they thinned the oil out when idling.. Now it's never been a big deal putting a boat on plane with a carb full of 150 to 1, but when you start throwing in what an engine can go thru pulling water skiers with a carb full of 150 to 1(400 to 1 above). That engine digging out a hole with load on it can't be happy eating a 400 to 1 mix..

In 96 OMC started with their Systems Check system. Those alarms work.. The ones before...well most times. OMC/Bomb is still the only 2 stroke engine that has a "NO" oil alarm and they had that back with the VRO I's from 84'. The low oil alarm should go off when the oil tank is at about 1/3rd.. OMC/Bomb is also the only engines(V6) to have fuel restriction alarms. A Merc/Yam you can run lean till it seizes up.

Oil Metering Systems(OMS) are what OMC called them after 95. They only go out to what 70 to 1.

Merc V6's has always had a good injection system. Simple as long as owners understand they work on manifold pressure to pressurize the oil tank to push oil back to the tank on the engine. Then it's gravity fed to the injection pump. You leave the cap off or the oring on the cap of remote fills is bad....your engine won't get any oil. The low oil alarm should go off if the oil in the engine tank goes below a certain level.. Mercs with only the oil tank on the engine are gravity fed to the injection pumps. No need to worry about seals holding pressure.

Yam puts their oil pump in the oil tank and pumps oil to another tank on the engine. Then it's basically the same deal as Merc, gravity feed.


Systems work, systems fail. If I was rigging an 88' 140hp Looper I'd let a qualified dealer make sure the VRO is working and tests right. That mean the alarms.. If the VRO doesn't check right I'd buy the fuel only pump for that engine and I'd mix oil in the fuel.

Something sticks in my mind that one of the first things Bomb did when they took over OMC was pull the bad/cheap rebuild VRO kits back from their dealers. Then the replacement VRO's were gone thru and changed to make them right. I know Bomb did lots more than just buy OMC and start pumping out new engines. They went back thru inventory and cleaned up a tons of **** that Soros bought cheap to rape OMC..when he was telling everyone how much money he was pumping in to OMC. What no one heard was how much he was hauling out the back door. Drives me nuts when I read some one saying Ficht problems killed OMC..

Sorry for the rant, but this VRO thing always gets my blood up... The article Bill Grannis wrote is thee bible..


One last thing.... 88' V4 OMC... I'd decarbon that thing to death. You can't tune a carbon loaded engine.. It's great engine with lots of balls, but it has to be carbon free to run right..
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
barnaclebillsmarine said:
You can also put a mark on the oil tank. You can add a quart of oil into your gas to 24 gallons of gas while your making sure the pump is working. How many wires are comming out of the wire harness on the pump?
There are 2 wires one to the ground and one to the gray wire on the red plug. I think I will bring it in before I drop it in the water. Just to be safe.
 
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