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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the effect of water temp on striper feeding, if the bait is there will the continue to feed. Was wondering if they slowed in colder tempetures or just quit all together and move on?
 

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Do you eat outside in the winter on a day like today? Do you think any animal or fish is that much different than us? Every fish has what I call an ideal water temp which I find makes them more active and increases your odds of catching the targeted species. But there are almost always fish around that care less about the temp. My ideal water temp for bass is 55. I generally target them in the spring and fall while the water temps are in the 50-63 range then move on to other species.
 

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Agreed with Justfish but I will stay on the stripers up to 70 at Sandy Hook. Justfish, "The ride is only as bad as the fishing" is about the truest statement in fishing :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do you eat outside in the winter on a day like today? Do you think any animal or fish is that much different than us? Every fish has what I call an ideal water temp which I find makes them more active and increases your odds of catching the targeted species. But there are almost always fish around that care less about the temp. My ideal water temp for bass is 55. I generally target them in the spring and fall while the water temps are in the 50-63 range then move on to other species.
Most animals that do not hibernate have to eat when its like this out. Some of the best white tail deer hunting out side the rut happens on the coldest of fronts ducks and geese also have to feeds in extreme wether conditions.I guess what i am asking is if the bite will still be on if the water temp drops another degree or two rapidly.We are not use to late winter bass fishing here am marking lots of bait and fish but seems like they have lock jaw more than not!
 

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It has been my experience that when fishing outside the ideal water temps the fish become very lazy or as you said lock jawed. They want an easy meal and don't want to expend energy to accomplish that task. Staying warm or cool seems to be more important than eating. I'm not saying they can't be caught, just that the time and effort required can be better used to target other species. As the temps drop tog, ling, and cod turn on. As the temps rise flounder, weakish, tuna, marlin etc turn on. IMO a lot of people get discouraged fishing the wrong species at the wrong time of the year/season. Water temp has everything to do with your sucess or failure and yes 1-2 degrees makes a huge difference when you are at the edge of that species ideal temp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It has been my experience that when fishing outside the ideal water temps the fish become very lazy or as you said lock jawed. They want an easy meal and don't want to expend energy to accomplish that task. Staying warm or cool seems to be more important than eating. I'm not saying they can't be caught, just that the time and effort required can be better used to target other species. As the temps drop tog, ling, and cod turn on. As the temps rise flounder, weakish, tuna, marlin etc turn on. IMO a lot of people get discouraged fishing the wrong species at the wrong time of the year/season. Water temp has everything to do with your sucess or failure and yes 1-2 degrees makes a huge difference when you are at the edge of that species ideal temp.
Thanks that is what i thought but just want it to go on for another week or two!
 

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I've had decent action in as little as 38-evan the rivers are running at least 39 this year-bass just cant chase your bait down, but if you hit them in the face literally with bait or a slow moving jig they will open their mouth and inhale-also they prefer soft baits(worms clams rotten baitfish etc) this time of year- go with those baits or jigs that imitate worms (nothing wrong with standard big mouth worms)-on slow sinking jigheads 3/8 or less-also look for them in moderate current-(I think)when its cold they can lay on the bottom and open their mouths to breathe-rather than pump their gills like they have to in stillwater-that way they are conserving energy-remember there is a layer of slow moving water underneathe anycurrent so they arent really in a current where they have to swim-just enough to keep water flowing over their gills, and just enough to bring an occasional bite to eat-also as little as a 1 degree temp rise could turn them on so fish from 3-6pm in brackish or fresh water :thumbsup:
 

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It has been my experience that when fishing outside the ideal water temps the fish become very lazy or as you said lock jawed.. Water temp has everything to do with your sucess or failure and yes 1-2 degrees makes a huge difference when you are at the edge of that species ideal temp.
I've had decent action in as little as 38-evan the rivers are running at least 39 this year-bass just cant chase your bait down, but if you hit them in the face literally with bait or a slow moving jig they will open their mouth and inhale-...just enough to keep water flowing over their gills, and just enough to bring an occasional bite to eat-also as little as a 1 degree temp rise could turn them on so fish from 3-6pm in brackish or fresh water :thumbsup:


Good points above. :thumbsup:
Mako, if you're talking about the ocean bass bite, the temps are now trending around 42, enough to give them lockjaw with artificials, though they will still hit clams, worms, and tapeworms in the coldest waters after a few sunny days....

But 42 seems to be lockjaw temp, right now, for NJ....Friends have gotten them on artis as low as 40, but that 42 temp seems to be holding,.and as long as it does the bass ocean fishing will be a slow pick...when it was 43 and 44 the bite was much more robust and active.....good luck.
 

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It's all about each species's metabolism. When conditions-water temps-are either under or over each species' comfort zone(especially under)they will eat just enough to stay alive.And when they do decide to eat they will be very sluggish to do so,as to not exert themselves to keep up their strength to stay alive. It's the main reason why any artificial must be fished as slow as possible this time of year,and,why it may be more productive in that it gives the 'caster' more probablities of presenting 'food' near the fish as opposed to bait fishing when your chances are slim as the fish are NOT moving around to save their strength. There will always be exceptions -see AdamBombs COD report of 2/16. A nice BLUEFISH made it to the deck!!
 

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It's all about each species's metabolism. When conditions-water temps-are either under or over each species' comfort zone(especially under)they will eat just enough to stay alive.And when they do decide to eat they will be very sluggish to do so,as to not exert themselves to keep up their strength to stay alive. It's the main reason why any artificial must be fished as slow as possible this time of year,and,why it may be more productive in that it gives the 'caster' more probablities of presenting 'food' near the fish as opposed to bait fishing when your chances are slim as the fish are NOT moving around to save their strength.

Excellent points made, Billo...:thumbsup: and to add to what you said about presentation, if you are fishing in colder water, the outgoing tide often gives you better presentation opportunities in the ocean when the fish are sluggish....

To also add to what Billo stated, on the Ebb tide you can control how "slow" you are fishing, to the nth degree...But while fishing the flood tide, you have less options, as generally you want to keep your offering equal to or slightly ahead of the current and rip flow for it to look natural,.,,,therefore sometimes making your presentation too "fast" to get attention from a sluggish fish....

And this time of year, we often say you "had to hit the fish right on the head" to get any kind of response...
If they swipe at it and miss, you're done for that cast...they generally will not come back for it...as opposed to the explosive spring fishing when their metabolism is higher and they will come back after it several times if they miss it at first...
 
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