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Just got my ACR Epirb. It is one of those automatic-release type. I have a 22ft. Aquasport cuddy, with a hardtop. Was wondering where would be the best place to mount this thing? I was thinking on the rear down tube on the hardtop, but would like some suggestions.
 

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Somewhere it's not going to get caught up if the boat goes down. That is an issue you hear about with hydro static releases, the boat swamps but it doesn't sink far enough to release the EPIRB or it gets caught up.
 

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I didn't get the hydrostatic release because of the potential for hang-ups. I originally mounted the EPIRB inside the CC but now have it in the EPIRB pocket of my ditch bag which is within arm's reach of the helm. In an emergency I just grab the bag and have everything in one sport including hand held VHF, water, food flares, etc. Plus when running our in dark a keep SpotFinder on my belt.
 

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I would like to hear Capt Scott's opinion here.

Mine is this. Consider where your gas tank is, prolly right under you console. If this is your only EPIRB or PLB mount it away from that. I think a fire is the most dangerous situation and you need to consider that you do not want a fire to cut off the ability to get to your survivables. I have seen a few do this.

Mine is mounted on the outside side of my consle and forward a bit. I do not like the hydrstatic release and want to "know" the best I can that the EPIRB deployed.

if things get hairy, in the way of seas, I put the EPIRB on my person. Along with liferaft on deck with painter tied off.
 

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On boats that might not sink all the way...it's a tough call. You might have to dive to release it unless you can rig a small float line to it that can be tripped from the surface if your boat rolls and only partially sinks.

On most powerboats that would normally go down stern first or where fire would be aft...I'd be tempted to mount it forward on the T-top for just someplace forward as much out of the weather as can be managed.
 

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My last rig was a Parker Pilot and had the ACR Cat1 in the plastic hardcase. I had it mounted on the roof for a couple of seasons with no issues. I was concerned about deployment of the unit as the hydrostatic release is caused by pressure - which I have been told does not occur until a depth of 9-13 feet (someone correct me if I am wrong). The Parker was supposed to have flotation and I thought about having to dive under the boat and release the unit manually - not fun. The new rig has a soft top and I really could not use the hard case so it is in a standard bracket right on the side of the helm seat.
 

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I always keep mine near the bridge if you only have one. I dont trust the hydrostatic though I have them. If i ever needed it i went manual deploy and hold it and not depend on release. Same with life raft, put them somewhere u can get to. I am not a fan of life rafts on hard tops or epirbs on hard tops, when the sheet hits the fan conditions will be touch and hard to get to spots limits your chances of survival. jmho
 

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Manual

After my Coast Guard career and seeing too much tragedy I have my own opinions:

If your boat is large enough carry a raft in a canister and inspect annually

If not large enough carry one in a valise bag and inspect as required

Have a good ditch kit nearby and not down under the bunk

If you need to abandon the boat, get mayday call out on VHF with Position and number of POB'S First

Make sure everyone on board DONS PFD, grab ditch bag and manually release and activate EPIRB.

Don't forget a float plan

At the beginning of year inventory all lifesaving equipment and check it. Don't be cheap and purchase lights and whistles for PFD'S, mark the expiration date of hand held flares and shotgun flares with a sharpie. Check your expiration dates on hydrostatic releases and EPIRB batteries. Make notes and replace if getting close.

I feel that if a few of these things were done in the Clearwater NFL players situation, they would have all survived. Remember, safety first and there is not a fish worth dying over. Sometimes we can get careless with safety gear when it is by far more important then those fresh ballyhoo on board.

This is just my opinion

Capt Dave
 
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