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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Striper fishing is just around the corner and Capt Diana and I are here in sunny California enjoying some warmer weather! I just wanted to share these pictures and story below from Kyle Bober here in CA. Hopefully as weather gets warmer the stripers will start to come into the area and we will have a great year! Until then, looking at fish pictures always helps.

Kyle Bober caught this 35 lb. White Sea Bass which is a relative to a weak fish, spotted sea trout and drum in the Croaker family from a center console in the kelp beds off La Jolla, California recently



We met Kyle at the Fred Hall show in Long Beach, CA last week and had the pleasure of discussing the differences between East Coast and West Coast fishing.

If you think this is a giant of the Croaker family my wife’s uncle lived in San Diego in the late 1940’s and 50’s and spent a great deal of time fishing the Sea of Cortez out of San Felipe, Baja. One of their primary targets species back then was the Totuava or Totoaba which grew to over 200 lbs. The White Sea Bass and Totuava belong to the Scianenidae family that includes drum, croakers and weakfish. Captain Diana's Aunt told her years ago the giant Totuava were abundant in the 50’s but it was almost totally wiped out by intensive commercial fishing and have become rare and endangered species.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think Corvina are just related and similar to weakfish in size.

The corvina, also known as the corvina drum (Cilus gilberti), is a saltwater fish of the Sciaenidae family (commonly called croakers or drums). It inhabits mostly tropical to temperate coastal waters of the southeastern Pacific along Central and South America. The corvina is highly prized in South America as a food fish.

The corvina is similar in appearance to its relatives the weakfish and spotted seatrout. Its body is blue-grey on top, silvery overall with small scales, and is elongated and somewhat compressed in shape. It has a large mouth and a dorsal fin that is deeply notched between spiny and soft parts. It reaches 75 cm (30 in) in length.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the write up John. Brings back good memories to where I was was born and raised (so cal.)


They are excellant eating Philly.


Joe-
Just thought I would share some information I picked up while my wife and I were visiting Southern CA. It really stuck with me when my wife's aunt showed us the pictures of the giant fish caught in Mexico years ago that were in the weakfish family. I cannot imagine fish like this in our local area.
I grew up fishing locally for weakfish in the spring and it was a right of passage back then and only hope we see the Weakies make a big comback in the near future. It would be nice if they grew to 40 lbs and were great eating and would that be fine.
 
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