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If I remember corectly. I bought spider wire back in about 92 or 93. It only came in white and cost about $30. anybody know if it came out earlier than that.
I think that the braided line is probably the most significant fishing tackle invention in the last 10 years.
 

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I think your rite ... it was spider wire

I only use braided line when fishing the old grounds or places with rough bottom.Still love the mono.I use the trilene line.Power pro is the best braided line...IMO!!!! ;)
 

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Braided line was once synonymous with Dacron, and before the discovery of nylon it was a primary line for fishing. However, nylon monofilament proved to be so superior to braided Dacron (which possessed poor knot strength, low abrasion resistance, and little stretch) that Dacron nearly disappeared in fishing, and today it has an infinitesimally small niche in the marketplace. It remains in use primarily as a backing material on fly reels; for a very few anglers, it is used as a big-game trolling product or a baitcasting reel product.

In the early 1990s, braided lines made from high-tech fibers became available. Because these lines featured great strength with small diameter, and because the fiber and no-stretch characteristics enhanced sensitivity, they became known as "super lines" or "microfilaments." Also called performance lines, microfilaments are braided from gel-spun polyethylene fiber (different grades or generations of Spectra, Dyneema, or Tekmillon) or from aramid fiber (Kevlar). The synthetic fiber itself, which is 10 times stronger than steel, has been used in industrial, aerospace, and military applications, and is incredibly strong yet very thin. Individual strands of fiber are married through an intricate, time-consuming, and costly braiding process. The result is an ultra thin, super strong, and very sensitive line.
 

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Before braid became available commercially for fishing applications guys were buying it in kite stores. My girls dad had used it freshwater bassing in the 80s sometime. he told me about it. Does anyone know what the line was that used to come from Ireland?? I heard it was sweet. It was for offshore fishing...like dacron I guess. I heard it can still be had for a pretty penny.
 

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That Capt. Lew knows his history! BUT, he has an advantage. He's lived through all of it ;)
:D
 

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Spiderwire was the first Spectra line I remember.

There have always been braided lines but Spectra was what turned it into what it is today.
 

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Depends on what you call braid. Super braids have been around since the early 90's.

My grandfather use to use braided line years and years ago! Dont have a clue as to when they actually came out.

I have a Bay rod from the 60's with original braided line spooled on the reel. It was my grandfathers
 

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Hip was on the money. Dacron was used a lot early on. I flew stunt kites (still do) and used braided lines, some were kevlar others were dacron. The low stretch and high strength made them ideal. Kevlar was great for kite fighting, you could saw the other guys lines off and make him crash!
 

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If you want to get crazy with braid history, I think the first braided lines were used by fly anglers, as it's the oldest recorded form of fishing (aside from a prehistoric caveman using a prehistoric mammoth bone fragment with a prehistoric worm on it
). I know they used braided silk and horsehair for lines and tippets, from centuries ago up into the early-20th century. Historic stories of fly fishing in China go back over 2000 years, I think. Crazy stuff :D .

So anyone who thinks they're cool getting into the new craze of fly fishing should read up on their history :D .

[ 05-28-2004, 01:05 PM: Message edited by: Fly Ty R ]
 
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