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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a beginners attempt at woodworking. I’m going to make 3 wood storage boxes for the boat, approximately 16 x 16 in size. I want to make them stackable; one for tools, one for first aid and safety items, and one for miscellaneous items. Nothing fancy, I’m not real concerned about appearance and they will be kept inside. I’ll be using 1 x 6 pine boards for the sides and ¼ plywood for the bottoms. I’ll cut rabbits and dados for joints. I’m looking for assembly advise. I was going to use titebond glue II on the joints and then varnish or paint. I was going to route the bottom edges so they would be stackable.

Any suggestions? Would you also use screws, dowels or brad nails on the joints? What paint or varnish would you use? What else would you do to make these boxes stand up to a marine environment?
 

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I think Tightbond 3 is the waterproof version.

I would then look at what your intent for the boxes are and the type of boat as for the finish. Is this a knock around crabbing I don't care what it looks like boat or something you want to last a while and care what it looks like.

An epoxy based paint will be a good finish if you aren't concerned about looks and lasting 10+ years. If you want it to last then I'd do a thin layer of Fiberglass and epoxy resin.

The attachment of the pieces together I'd look at what you're comfortable in working with.
 

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Use gorrilla glue. Also use all ply. Dado's are stong and with the poly glue they are super strong. I would advise you to use ac ply or marine ply. Coating the boxes are another issue on its own. Someone will reply with better answers. Post up pics of your project.
 

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Use gorrilla glue. Also use all ply. Dado's are stong and with the poly glue they are super strong. I would advise you to use ac ply or marine ply. Coating the boxes are another issue on its own. Someone will reply with better answers. Post up pics of your project.
Good advise on the polyurethane glue (gorilla) Just make sure you use it sparingly and clamp it good, it will expand a lot and blow your joints out. Skip the pine(it will split over time) use ply and don't waste your $$$ on marine ply, there is no need for it. Put a coat of resin and FG mat if your feelin ambitious then paint with an epoxy type paint
 

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Sounds like the storage space size was for a chemical toilet. Three storage boxs that stack would be nice to have. Plywood, stainless screws and a poly finish of a few coats should work fine. It sounds like you'll have it in a dryer area too.
 

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This is a beginners attempt at woodworking. I’m going to make 3 wood storage boxes for the boat, approximately 16 x 16 in size. I want to make them stackable; one for tools, one for first aid and safety items, and one for miscellaneous items. Nothing fancy, I’m not real concerned about appearance and they will be kept inside. I’ll be using 1 x 6 pine boards for the sides and ¼ plywood for the bottoms. I’ll cut rabbits and dados for joints. I’m looking for assembly advise. I was going to use titebond glue II on the joints and then varnish or paint. I was going to route the bottom edges so they would be stackable.

Any suggestions? Would you also use screws, dowels or brad nails on the joints? What paint or varnish would you use? What else would you do to make these boxes stand up to a marine environment?
I would try the small stackable milk type containers you can line the inside with plastic or starboard or plywood.If you have to buy the materials you are looking at $$ unless you need something to do?
 

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I'd echo the "go plastic" comments on this one. It sounds like you are starting on woodworking, and that's great, but for the boat, around water, nothing beats pastic storage containers.

You say 16 x 16, how deep though??
 

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Ever think of using 1/4" starboard?
Good Luck.
A even better (and cheaper) alternative would be using Azak (PVC Board). You can glue the edges together with PVC cement, and they are damn near unbreakable, and last forever.

You can sand it and can even paint it with the Rustolem plastic paint. I have done it on many garden projects with great results.

If you have any friends that are builders or contractors, see if they can get you some scraps.
 

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Wood....
Ditch the pine, bad call for any project that'll be exposed to humid conditions. 3/4" Cabinet grade plywood is fairly cheap at Home Cheapo.

Jointing.....
A rabbit bit in a router will give you a good strong box joint, as stated above, be very careful if you use Gorilla Glue, it expands like crazy, foams up and makes a mess if you use too much. For the marine enviroment I would use Resorkinal, West System, or some other epoxy type wood glue.
The glue is what will hold the joints together, use brads and wood clamps, set the brads and fill the holes with either a resin, or epoxy filler to keep them from rusting.

Finish......
Depending on use, where they will be stored, and exposure to salt water contamination, a good epoxy based paint would be the minimum, fiberglass with an epoxy finish if exposure will be severe.

What I've done in the past with making boxes is to build a complete (solid) box, then set the depth of your lid on a table saw, and pass all 4 sides through the table saw to form the lid, stainless steel hinges, clasp, and handle to finish it off. If it needs to be water tight, I line one edge with self sticking foam weather seal tape before setting the lid hinges.

For stacking, you could use industrial grade self sticking hook and loop (velcro) strips, velcro the bottom box to the deck, and the other boxes to each other, this will keep them from sliding around or falling over in rough seas.......
 

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Plastic "X-Board or Azek".Comes in 3/8" and 3/4" sheets,or 3/4"thick boards.Glue and screw the corners,no need to paint or can be painted.I probably have enough scraps you can have.Will last for ever and is very light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the replies.

Here is an update. I used 1x 6’s because I already had them and I decided to use 3/8 vs ¼ for the bottoms. I made out ok with the joints for a beginner. They were a little loose but I feel they are adequate for my first attempt. I used Titebond II and every thing is reasonably straight and feels tight. There’s no way I’ll be able to route the bottoms and make them stackable as originally intended, but Velcro should do the trick.

As you can see the location is well protected from the elements, but the boxes will get bounced around and be exposed to heat and humidity.





I decided to reshape the boxes and leave the hoses alone in case I ever decide to put things back the way they were.



Since I didn’t route the bottoms they are actually a little too tall. When I got back home I took 1 inch off of one of the boxes. They should fit quite nicely now.



My concern now is warping and splitting. I was thinking I would do 2 or 3 coats of epoxy resin on everything with 6-inch fiberglass tape cut to size around the outside. Do you think this is a good idea or a waste of time? I figure I’m probably going to do it over with Plywood or Azek in a couple years so should I even bother with the extra effort?

What do you think?
 
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